Search Site View Your Basket £
National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome

About PMS

NAPS STATEMENT ON THE DEFINITION OF PMS

 

PMS / PMDD
NAPS working definition

Current situation

Premenstrual Syndromes refers to a spectrum of mood and physical symptoms that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle (i.e. the phase that begins after ovulation and ends with the start of menstruation).  The fields of Psychiatry and Gynaecology have developed separate, but overlapping, diagnostic criteria for premenstrual syndromes.  
The American Psychiatric Association (APA) criteria focus predominantly on psychiatric symptoms. These are defined, under the term premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). PMDD requires that 5 out of 11 stipulated symptoms (one of which must be from a list of 4 specific mood symptoms), are present during the luteal  phase of the menstrual cycle. The diagnosis excludes the exacerbation of another disorder (e.g. depression or panic disorder) and must be severe enough to disrupt daily functioning 1.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) focuses more equally on psychiatric and physical symptoms in its definition of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It only requires that 1 out of 6 stipulated mood symptoms, and 1 of 4 stipulated physical symptoms, are present. Further, it does not exclude the exacerbation of another disorder (e.g. depression or panic disorder). However, it stipulates that there must be associated  subjective reports of dysfunction.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) focuses predominantly on psychiatric symptoms. These are defined, under the term Premenstrual Tension Syndrome (PMTS) within the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). It requires that only 1 out of 9 stipulated mood, or 1 out of a list of other physical symptoms are present. Further, it does not exclude symptoms caused by the exacerbation of another disorder (e.g. depression or panic disorder) or require subjective reports of dysfunction.
Read More >>